DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20170834

Cost analysis of antipsychotic drugs available in India

Ajay Kumar Shukla, Astha Agnihotri

Abstract


Background: Indian drug market has large numbers of branded formulations for every drug molecule. 1 Cost-sensitive healthcare environment has created a challenging workplace for clinicians. Efficient use of healthcare resources without compromising quality of patient care has been a challenging task for healthcare professionals. There is a wide range of variation in the prices of drugs marketed in India. Thus, a study was planned to analyse out cost variations of antiepileptic drugs available in Indian market.

Methods: Minimum and maximum costs in Rupees (INR) of different brands of same generic antipsychotic drugs, in the same strength and dosage forms were compared. The cost ratio and percentage cost variation were calculated for each generic antipsychotic drug. The number of formulations for antipsychotic drugs and number of brands for each of them were also taken into consideration.

Results: This study shows that in Indian market, there are wide variations in the prices of different brands of same generic antipsychotic drug. The highest cost ratio and percent cost variation was found for risperidone 2 mg [(1:16.27) and 1527.48], followed by risperidone 4 mg [(1:16.25) and 1525.25], risperidone 3 mg [(1:15.67) and 1467.33], risperidone 1 mg [(1:14.86) and 1386.78], olanzapine 10 mg [(1:12.36) and 1136.84], and olanzapine 5 mg [(1:12.31) and 1130.76]. Highest number of brands of antipsychotic drug available in Indian market are for divalproex sodium 500mg(25) followed by olanzapine 15 mg(23), olanzapine 5 mg(23), olanzapine 2.5mg(14), and risperidone 1 mg (14). Highest numbers of formulations of antipsychotic drug available in Indian market are for olanzapine(06), quetiapine(05), haloperidol(05), and aripiprazole(05).

Conclusions: In Indian market, the average percentage price variation of different brands of the same oral antipsychotic drugs is very wide. Treatment with antipsychotic drugs usually has a long course with treatment adherence being a crucial factor for successful treatment. Improved adherence to the drug treatment can be ensured by decreasing the cost of therapy. Decreased drug cost expenditure can be ensured by changes in the government policies and regulations, integrating pharmacoeconomics as part of medical education curriculum, and creating awareness among treating physicians for switching to cost effective therapy.


Keywords


Adherence, Cost analysis, Compliance, Cost variation, Health Economics

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