Study on self-medication among 2nd year medical students

K. Jagadeesh, K. N. Chidananda, Sreenivas P. Revankar, Nagaraja S. Prasad

Abstract


Background: Self-medication is use of medicines by individuals to treat self-recognized symptoms and illness. Self-medication is a common type of self-care behavior in the general public, but medical students differ in such practice, as they have knowledge about drugs and diseases.

Methods: The present study involved 100 2nd year final term medical students in “Shivamogga Institute of Medical Sciences,” Shivamogga, Karnataka. Study was questionnaire based, and the results were analyzed by descriptive statistical methods.

Results: In our study, 57% were female, and 43% were male. About 60% had knowledge about over the counter (OTC) drugs and considered Ayurveda drugs also OTC drugs. 25% considered self-medication entirely safe, whereas 61% considered self-medication have advantages. Self-medication was preferred by 72% as they felt that there is no need to consult health care professionals for a simple ailment. Self-medication was practiced by 62% students, among which 86% were appropriate, and 48% among them utilized knowledge from previous consultation. In 28% fever was the most common condition and paracetamol was the most commonly used drug.

Conclusions: Self-medication was widely practiced among the students. They had good knowledge of OTC drugs. The practice of self-medication was almost appropriate. In general self-medication must be accompanied by appropriate information. Educating benefits and risks of self-medication is very much needed for medical students and the public now a day.


Keywords


Self-medication, Over the counter, Medical students, Questionnaire

Full Text:

PDF

References


Shiferaw M, Fanta H. Epidemiology, A Manual for Health Workers and Students in 112 Ethiopia. Ethiopia: Published by Health Learning Materials Development and Production Division, Ministry of Health; 1990.

Gutema GB, Gadisa DA, Kidanemariam ZA, Berhe DF, Berhe AH, Hadera MG, et al. Self-medication practices among health sciences students: the case of Mekelle University. J Appl Pharm Sci. 2011;1(10):183-9.

Bashir MSM, Bansod KA, Khade A, Konnoju M, Rani U, Vadala KV. Self-medication - A comparative study between 2nd and 3rd year medical students. Int J Basic Appl Med Sci. 2013;3(2):1-7.

WHO Resource. The role of the pharmacist in self-care and self-medication. Responsible self-medication, 1998. Available at http://www.apps.who.int/medicinedocs/en/d/Jwhozip32e/3.3.html. Accessed 15 October 2014.

Subin MZ, Vidya V, Halima OA, Geetu G, Devika N. Monitoring the safety aspects of over the counter medications. IRJP. 2013;3(3):109-11.

Jaina P, Sachanb A, Singlac R, Agrawala P. Statistical study on self medication pattern in Haryana, India. Indo Glob J Pharm Sci. 2012;2(1):21-35.

Patel P, Prajapati A, Ganguly B, Gajjar B. Study on impact of pharmacology teaching on knowledge, attitude and practice on self-medication among medical students. Int J Med Sci Public Health. 2013;2(2):181-6.

Sontakke SD, Bajait CS, Pimpalkhute SA, Jaiswal KM, Jaiswal SR. Comparative study of evaluation of self-medication practices in first and third year medical students. Int J Biol Med Res. 2011;2(2):561-4.

El Ezz NF, Ez-Elarab HS. Knowledge, attitude and practice of medical students towards self medication at Ain Shams University, Egypt. J Prev Med Hyg. 2011;52(4):196-200.

Badiger S, Kundapur R, Jain A, Kumar A, Pattanshetty S, Thakolkaran N, et al. Self-medication patterns among medical students in South India. Australas Med J. 2012;5(4):217-20.

Thadani S, Salman MT, Ahamed A. Knowledge attitude and practice of self medication among second year undergraduate medical students. J Ration Pharmacother Res. 2013;1(3):131-4.

Kumari R, Kiran, Kumar D, Bahl R, Gupta R. Study of knowledge and practice of selfmedication among medical students at Jammu. J Med Sci. 2012;15(2):141-4.

James H, Handu SS, Al Khaja KA, Otoom S, Sequeira RP. Evaluation of the knowledge, attitude and practice of self-medication among first-year medical students. Med Princ Pract. 2006;15(4):270-5.