Assessment of antimicrobial activity of Meliponula ferrugica in pathogenic wound samples

Authors

  • Jasmin Sajini Rajayan Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
  • Naveen Rangasamy Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
  • Niranjan Lakshmi Narayan Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Sri Ramachandra Faculty of Pharmacy, SRIHER, Porur, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
  • Vijila Helen Mary George Department of Microbiology, Malankara Catholic College, Kanyakumari District, Tamil Nadu, India
  • Karthik Rajendran Department of Bioanalytical, Scitus Pharma Services Private Limited, Thirumazhisai, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20241652

Keywords:

Antibacterial, Antifungal, Bactericidal, Bacteriostatic, Honey, Human infection, Wounds

Abstract

Background: Honey is a naturally occurring sweet material that bees make from nectar from flowers, secretions from plant parts, or excretions from plants that suck insects from plant parts. Honey’s antibacterial and antifungal qualities are widely known, and it has been used to heal burns, surgical wounds, and decubitus ulcers. Honey instantly sterilizes wounds affected by Staphylococcus aureus. The honey’s ability to fight bacteria can be ascertained by the nectar’s origin.  Many antibiotic resistances among the bacteria that cause infections in humans have directly evolved as a result of the use of antibiotics in clinical practice.

Methods: This study found that Bergey’s manual of determinative bacteriology can be used to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. According to the study’s findings, honey has a capacity to neutralise Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus that have been isolated from infected wounds. Honey’s antibacterial characteristics account for a significant portion of its antibacterial activity.

Results: Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were both susceptible to the antibacterial activity of the honey sample. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibited lower activity compared to Staphylococcus aureus.

Conclusions: The results of this investigation show that Bergey’s handbook of determinative bacteriology can be used to identify Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. According to the study’s findings, honey has the ability to neutralise Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus that have been isolated from infected wounds.

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Published

2024-06-25

How to Cite

Rajayan, J. S., Rangasamy, N., Narayan, N. L., George, V. H. M., & Rajendran, K. (2024). Assessment of antimicrobial activity of Meliponula ferrugica in pathogenic wound samples. International Journal of Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 13(4), 511–519. https://doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20241652

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Original Research Articles