Assessment of efficacy and safety of clindamycin with nicotinamide in mild to moderate acne vulgaris: a prospective study

Authors

  • A T Priyanka Junior resident, Department of Pharmacology, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, Bengaluru
  • K. R. Mamatha Department of Pharmacology, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
  • R. Yuvarani Department of Pharmacology, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
  • K. Yamini Department of Pharmacology, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20241651

Keywords:

Acne vulgaris, Clindamycin, Nicotinamide, Prospective study

Abstract

Background: Acne vulgaris is a very common skin disease that is usually treated with topical products, systemic medications, or a combination of both. Acne vulgaris affects approximately 9% of the population worldwide causing permanent physical scarring, negatively affects the quality of life and self-image, and has been associated with increased rates of anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation.

Methods: This was a prospective study conducted at BMCRI including thirty-five subjects who were diagnosed with mild to moderate acne vulgaris. Patients were treated with topical clindamycin 1% with nicotinamide 4%. Efficacy was assessed by mean change in acne severity index (ASI) and total lesion count (TLC) from baseline and at the end of 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Safety was assessed by adverse events reported.

Results: There was statistically significant improvement noted at the end of each visit. Baseline ASI was 88.05±4.02 and end of 12 weeks was 14.17±2.7. Baseline TLC was 30.17±1.33 and at the end of 12 weeks was 4.25±0.99. Both the ASI and TLC results were statistically significant at the end of fourth, eighth and twelfth-week p value <0.0001.

Conclusions: Combination topical formulations are the most broadly used treatment regimen for Acne vulgaris to target one or more steps in the pathogenesis of acne. From the results of the present study the participants on combination of clindamycin with nicotinamide had a significant improvement in acne lesions at end of 12th week of topical application and were satisfied with the therapy with no major adverse effects.

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Published

2024-06-25

How to Cite

A T Priyanka, Mamatha, K. R., Yuvarani, R., & Yamini, K. (2024). Assessment of efficacy and safety of clindamycin with nicotinamide in mild to moderate acne vulgaris: a prospective study. International Journal of Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 13(4), 506–510. https://doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20241651

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Original Research Articles