Evaluation of nephrotoxicity effects of the methanol leaf extract of A. angustifolia in Wistar rats

Authors

  • Joseph L. Akpan Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Basic Medicals Sciences, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria
  • Paschal N. Wokota Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Basic Medicals Sciences, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria
  • Sylvester C. Ohadoma Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Basic Medicals Sciences, University of Calabar, Calabar, Nigeria
  • Tharcitus C. Onwudiwe Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Madonna University, Elele Campus, Nigeria
  • Casimir E. Okoroama Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Basic Clinical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nigeria
  • Ogbonnaya N. Iganga Department of Pharmacology, Alex Ekwueme Federal University, Ndufu-Alike, Ikwo, Nigeria
  • Matthew O. Nwokike Department of Pharmacology, Prince Abubakar Audu University, Anyigba, Kogi State, Nigeria
  • Godwin C. Akuodor Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Basic Clinical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nigeria

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20240984

Keywords:

A. angustifolia, Leaf extract, Nephrotoxicity, Rats

Abstract

Background: Agave angustifolia is a common traditional remedy in localities for disease treatment. This study focussed on evaluating the nephrotoxicity activity of the methanol extract of A. angustifolia leaf.

Methods: Twenty-five Wistar rats of both sex were randomly shared into five groups. Group 1 received 10 mL/kg distilled water, group 2 gentamicin 80mg/kg, extract groups (3, 4 and 5) were placed on 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg of A. angustifolia leaf extract  administered orally through an orogastric tube for 14 days. The rats were sacrificed using chloroform, and their kidneys were harvested, weighed and immediately fixed in 10% buffered formalin for histological analysis and blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture for biochemical and haematological analysis.

Results: Results showed there was no marked difference in the levels of the packed cell volume (PCV) in all the concentrations of the extract as well as the controls. The gentamicin group showed a remarkable rise in the serum urea and creatinine level when compared to both the control and extract groups. Similar effects were observed in the 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of the extract. However, severe kidney injury was observed in the group treated with 400 mg/kg of the extract.

Conclusions: Despite the beneficial potential of A. angustifolia, it also exhibited toxic effects on the kidney thereby causing significant damage to the kidney morphology at higher doses. The damages inflicted in these tissues are dose-dependent. Therefore A. angustifolia should be taken in low doses within shortest period of time.

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Published

2024-04-25

How to Cite

Akpan, J. L., Wokota, P. N., Ohadoma, S. C., Onwudiwe, T. C., Okoroama, C. E., Iganga, O. N., Nwokike, M. O., & Akuodor, G. C. (2024). Evaluation of nephrotoxicity effects of the methanol leaf extract of A. angustifolia in Wistar rats. International Journal of Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 13(3), 307–314. https://doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20240984

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