Questionnaire-based assessment on knowledge, attitude and practice of fixed-dose combination in medical undergraduates of a tertiary care teaching hospital, Kanpur

Authors

  • Virendra Kushwaha Department of Pharmacology, GSVM Medical College, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Pooja Agrawal Department of Pharmacology, GSVM Medical College, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Alpana Sahu Department of Pharmacology, GSVM Medical College, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Pushpendra Pushkar Department of Pharmacology, GSVM Medical College, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Nasreen F. Khan Department of Pharmacology, GSVM Medical College, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Harsh Vekaria Department of Pharmacology, GSVM Medical College, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20240377

Keywords:

Fixed dose combination, Drug resistance, Pre-test, Post-test

Abstract

Background: Aim was to assess knowledge, attitude and practice of second-year medical undergraduates towards FDC.

Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted among second-year medical undergraduates of GSVM, medical college, Kanpur in the form of a pre-test, and after sensitizing the students about FDC, the same questionnaire was given as a post-test.

Results: A total of 251 students, 157 students participated in the pre-test and 140 participated in the post-test. The percentage of male students in pre and post-test were more (58% and 61.4%) compared to female students (42% and 38.6%). After conducting a post-test survey, there is a significant improvement in knowledge and attitude toward FDC.

Conclusions: The inclusion of FDC in the undergraduate curriculum is a good initiative by NMC but there is a need to conduct more CME, symposiums, and workshops in medical colleges to update the knowledge regarding FDC among medical undergraduates. 

References

Sreedhar D, Subramanian G, Udupa N. Combination drugs: are they rational? Curr Sci. 2006;91(4):406.

Auwal F, Dahiru MN, Abdu-Aguye SN. Availability and rationality of fixed dose combinations available in Kaduna, Nigeria. Pharm Pract (Granada). 2019;17(2):1470.

World Health Organization. The use of essential drugs. WHO Technical Report Series 825. Geneva: World Health Organization. 1992. Available at: www.medlineindia.com. Accessed on 15th August 2023.

Bangalore S, Kamalakkannan G, Parkar S, Franz HM. Fixed-dose combinations improve medication compliance: a meta-analysis. Am J Med. 2007;120(8):713-9.

Menditto E, Orlando Rosa G, Paola M, Umberto MM, Caitriona C et al. Patient-centric pharmaceutical drug product design-the impact on medication adherence. Pharmaceutics. 2020;12(1):E44.

Kastury N, Singh S, Ansari KU. An audit of prescription for rational use of fixed-dose drug combinations. Indian J Pharmacol. 1999;31:367 69.

Iftikha S, Sarwar MR. Potential disadvantages associated with treatment of active tuberculosis using fixed-dose combination: a review of literature. J Basic Clin Pharm. 2017;8:S131-6.

Amitava S. Indian market's fixation with fixed-dose combinations (Editorial.) Rational Drug Bull. 2002;12:1.

Guidelines on Fixed dose combination. Available at: http://www.medlineindia.com/acts/guidelines%20on%20fixed%20%dose%20combination. Accessed on 12 November, 2023.

Panda J, Tiwari P, Uppal R. Evaluation of rationality of some FDC: Focus on antihypertensive drugs. Indian J Pharm Sci. 2006;68:649 52.

Azmi T, Agarwal P, Kushwaha, Mohan S, Kumar A, Sharma H. Comparative analysis of efficacy and safety of fixed versus the free equivalent combination of 1% Brinzolamide and 0.5% Timolol in glaucoma patients: A prospective observational study. IJPR. 2021;13(2):1104-10.

Moulding T. Fixed-Dose Combinations of Ant tuberculous medications to prevent drug resistance. Ann Intern Med. 1995;122(12):951.

Hutchins V, Zhang B, Fleurence R, Krishnarajah G, Graham J. A systematic review of adherence, treatment satisfaction and costs, in fixed-dose combination regimens in type 2 diabetes. Curr Med Res Opin. 2011;27(6):1157-68.

825. Geneva: World Health Organization, 1992. 3. www.medlineindia.com. Guidelines on Fixed Dose Combinations. Cited on 28 Aug 2022. Available at: http://www.medlineindia.com/acts/guidelines%20on%20fixed%20dose%20combinations. Accessed on 12 November, 2023.

Kushwaha V, Agarwal P, Azmi T, Shukla V, Das A. Fixed dose combination -Rationale, use, Advantages, and disadvantages Brief Review. WJPR. 2022;11(3):628-38

Gautam CS, Saha L. Fixed dose drug combinations (FDCs): rational or irrational: a view point. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2008;65(5):795-6.

Ravichandran A, Balamurugan J, Shankareswari, Sekar R. Knowledge, attitude and prescriptional practice about fixed dose combinations among medical practitioners in tertiary care hospital. Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol. 2017;6:1937-42.

Gupta R, Malhotra P, Malhotra A. Assessment of knowledge, attitude, and practices about prescribing fixed dose combinations among doctors - An observational study. Natl J Physiol Pharm Pharmacol. 2018;8(3):347-52

Vinnakota NR, Krishna V, Viswanath V, Ahmed Z, Shaik KS, Boppana NK. Assessment of knowledge, attitude, and practices on fixed dose combinations among postgraduate dental students. J Int Soc Prevent Communit Dent. 2016;6:S243-7

Goswami N, Gandhi A, Patel P, Dikshit R. An evaluation of knowledge, attitude and practices about prescribing fixed dose combinations among resident doctors. Perspect Clin Res. 2013;4(2):130-5.

Downloads

Published

2024-02-23

How to Cite

Kushwaha, V., Agrawal, P., Sahu, A., Pushkar, P., Khan, N. F., & Vekaria, H. (2024). Questionnaire-based assessment on knowledge, attitude and practice of fixed-dose combination in medical undergraduates of a tertiary care teaching hospital, Kanpur. International Journal of Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 13(2), 228–232. https://doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20240377

Issue

Section

Original Research Articles