A study of reporting pattern of adverse drug reactions in a tertiary care teaching hospital

Authors

  • Shailendra Kumar Department of Pharmacology, Patna Medical College, Patna, Bihar, India
  • Rohit Kumar Singh Department of Pharmacology, Patna Medical College, Patna, Bihar, India
  • Raj Narayan Seth Department of Pharmacology, Patna Medical College, Patna, Bihar, India
  • Rani Indira Sinha Department of Pharmacology, Patna Medical College, Patna, Bihar, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20223355

Keywords:

Adverse drug reactions, Pharmacovigilance, Individual case safety reports, Health care professionals

Abstract

Background: Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are one of the prime causes of morbidity and mortality, increase in hospital stay and socioeconomic burden on the patients. Periodic monitoring aids in formulating methods for safe usage of medicines in hospitals. Identification of ADRs and their reporting pattern can provide useful information for their prevention. Hence this study was done to see the pattern of reported ADRs in Patna Medical College and Hospital, Patna in a 3 months of study.

Methods: It was an observational and retrospective study carried out between July 2022 to September 2022. Both outpatients and inpatients were included in the study. The ADRs in the form of Individual Case Safety Reports (ICSRs) were sent to the nearby adverse drug reaction monitoring centre (AMC).

Results: The occurrence of ADRs was more common in females (56.25%) as compared to males (43.75%). Patients of age-group 21-40 years (40.625%) were most commonly involved. Medicine department (34.375%) reported the maximum percentage of ADRs. Antimicrobials (37.50%) was the most common drug-group causing ADRs. Maximum reported ADRs (81.25%) were probable, 9.375% were possible, 6.25% were certain, while 3.125% were unlikely with the suspected drug as per Naranjo scale.

Conclusions: The pattern of ADRs reported in our hospital is comparable with the results of studies conducted in hospital setup elsewhere, along with a few differences. The study results revealed opportunities for interventions in ADR management especially for the preventable ADRs to ensure safer drug use.

Author Biography

Shailendra Kumar, Department of Pharmacology, Patna Medical College, Patna, Bihar, India

PG student, department of Pharmacology.

Patna Medical College, Patna.

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Published

2022-12-26

How to Cite

Kumar, S., Singh, R. K., Seth, R. N., & Sinha, R. I. (2022). A study of reporting pattern of adverse drug reactions in a tertiary care teaching hospital. International Journal of Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 12(1), 58–63. https://doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20223355

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Original Research Articles