DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20213750

A perceptional analysis of online and offline mode of lectures in second year undergraduate medical students at SMIMER medical college, Surat

Antra M. Patel, Kirti Saxena, Arvind Singh Panwar

Abstract


Background: The COVID-19 pandemic demanded lockdown to control the spread of disease, inevitably medical colleges are also affected and online mode of teaching has become a solution for continuity of teaching in medical colleges. The main purpose of study to identify perception of medical students towards online and offline mode of lectures by parameters as follows: knowledge, understanding, skills and methodology.

Methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional study with duration of three months. A well- articulated set of questionnaires based on knowledge, understanding, skills and methodology parameters will be circulated among the second-year undergraduate medical students from SMIMER, Surat.

Results: About 82% of the students perceived that offline mode of lectures provide more information of subject and helps with better retention of knowledge. Only 21.5% students were in favour of online mode for being able to understand lecture content. For the development of the practical skills and clinical training, 97% of the participants favoured offline mode. However, 67% of the participants believe online mode of lectures save their time and work well with their schedule.

Conclusions: Majority of students perceived that offline mode of lectures provide more information of subjects and better retention of knowledge. According to them offline mode of lectures is easy to understand and improved conceptual thinking. For development of clinical and practical skills offline mode of lectures is mandatory. But, majority of students perceived that online learning provide flexibility in participation of lectures and time saving method.


Keywords


Perceptional analysis, Online lectures, Offline lectures, Medical students

Full Text:

PDF

References


Lu H, Stratton CW, Tang YW. Outbreak of pneumonia of unknown etiology in Wuhan, China: The mystery and the miracle. J Med Virol. 2020;92(4):401-2.

World Health Organization. WHO announces COVID-19 outbreak a pandemic. 2020. Available at: https://bit.ly/35KytdL. Accessed on 10 March 2020.

Giovannella C. Effect induced by the COVID-19 pandemic on students’ perception about technologies and distance learning. Conference: SLERD 2020. Available at: https://bit.ly/3mzsEGN. Accessed on 10 March 2021.

Parker EB, Howland LC. Strategies to manage the time demands of online teaching. Nurse Educator. 2006;31:270.

Cook DA. Web-based learning: Pros, cons and controversies. Clin Med. 2007;7:37.

Eldeeb RA. Students’ Perceptions to E-learning. J Res Method Education. 2014;4(3):33-6.

Rochester D, Pradel F. Students' Perceptions and Satisfaction with a Web-Based Human Nutrition Course. Am J Pharm Educ. 2008;72(4):91.

Frehywot S, Vovides Y, Talib Z. E-learning in medical education in resource constrained low- and middle-income countries. Hum Resour Health. 2013;11:4.

O’Doherty D, Dromey M, Lougheed J, Hannigan A, Last J, McGrath D. Barriers and solutions to online learning in medical education–an integrative review. BMC Med Educ. 2018;18(1):130.

Parker EB, Howland LC. Strategies to manage the time demands of online teaching. Nurse Educator. 2006;31:270.

Cook DA. Web-based learning: Pros, cons and controversies. Clin Med. 2007;7:37.

Cheung C, Cable J. Eight Principles of Effective Online Teaching: A Decade-Long Lessons Learned in Project Management Education. Proj Manag World J. 2017;6:1-16.