DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20211030

Ceftraixone induced anaphylaxis and death: a case report

Ameya Puranik

Abstract


Ceftriaxone, a broad spectrum third generation cephalosporin antibiotic and sulbactam is a beta-lactamase inhibitor. The combination is used for pre-operative surgical prophylaxis for prevention is secondary bacterial infection.  We describe a patient who developed anaphylaxis and death soon after intravenous administration of ceftriaxone and sulbactam combination and review similar cases of adverse effects to these class of drugs. The patient was a 68 year old male admitted to surgery ward for obstructed inguinal hernia. He was prescribed injection ceftriaxone and sulbactam combination along with concomitant medication injection pantoprazole and injection metronidazole. The patient was injected injection ceftriaxone and sulbactam, within 15 minutes he suddenly developed anaphylactic shock and died for fluid aspiration in lungs during resuscitation. PubMed was searched for the following terms: anaphylaxis, ceftriaxone, sulbactam. The papers containing these terms and their references were reviewed. Anaphylactic shock caused by ceftriaxone is an uncommon adverse event in patients receiving the drug. However, similar reactions have been observed in some cases in India and world-wide. Clinicians should be aware that anaphylaxis secondary to ceftriaxone and sulbactam combination is a serious death threatening side-effect.


Keywords


Ceftriaxone, Anaphylaxis, Death, Drug safety, Pharmacovigilance, ADR, SUSAR

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References


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