DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20192175

Evaluation of trigger tool method for adverse drug reaction reporting by nursing staff at a tertiary care teaching hospital

Urmila J. Menat, Chetna K. Desai, Megha K. Shah, Asha N. Shah

Abstract


Background: To sensitize nurses about Trigger Tool Method (TTM) and to evaluate the impact of TTM on adverse drug event (ADE) reporting by nurses at a tertiary care teaching hospital in India.

Methods: This was prospective, interventional, single center study conducted among nursing health professionals of Civil Hospital Ahmedabad (CHA) posted in Medicine Department. They were sensitized about ADE reporting, pharmacovigilance, methods of ADRs reporting and details about TTM. Also, a list of 17 triggers was prepared by the investigator and given to nurses. They were educated to report ADEs using TTM. At the initiation and end of study, questionnaires were given to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice of ADR reporting among participant nurses. All triggers and ADEs reported were analyzed in terms of association between them, effectiveness of trigger in detecting an ADR and in terms of Positive Predictive Value (PPV). Reported ADRs were also assessed for causality, severity and preventability.

Results: A total 758 patients were admitted during the study period in the respective medicine department. List of 17 triggers consists of 9 drug triggers (DT), 1 laboratory trigger (LT) and 7 patient triggers (PT). Of these 17 triggers, 14 triggers were identified by nurses. These 14 triggers were noticed 130 times. These included DT (100 times), LT (0 times) and PT (30 times). Of the various triggers observed, 7 DT and 4 PT were related to ADRs. Hence, 11 triggers (64.70%) were positive (related to ADRs), out of 17 total triggers under evaluation. 21 ADRs were observed using TTM by nurses.

Conclusions: The TTM helps to detect and report ADRs by nurses. Educational interventions about TTM help in better detection and reporting of ADRs.


Keywords


Adverse drug event, Adverse drug reaction reporting, Nursing health professionals, Pharmacovigilance, PvPI, Trigger tool method

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