DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20185161

Drug utilization pattern of antimicrobials use in upper respiratory tract infection in paediatric patient of rural tertiary care hospital

Varsha P. Gajbhiye, Lamture Y. R.

Abstract


Background: Antimicrobial agents (AMAs) are most commonly prescribed drugs for lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). This study was conducted to evaluate pattern of prescription and AMAs use in paediatric patient for LRTI in wards of rural tertiary care teaching hospital.

Methods: This is prospective, observational study undertaken in paediatric patient in tertiary care hospital. Prescriptions of 60 patient of age group 1-12years diagnosed with LRTI admitted in paediatric ward of rural tertiary care teaching hospital were studied. Positive blood sample were studied for common microorganisms, their sensitivity and resistance to AMAs.

Results: Out of 60 patients admitted in paediatric ward of LRTI, 12 patients were of mild to moderate pneumonia, three patients were of bronchiolitis, ten patients were of croups, three patients were of bronchitis and 37 patients were of severe pneumonia. The most frequently prescribed AMAs were combination of cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. The most common organism isolated was streptococcus pneumoniae sensitive to vancomycin in 92.3% and meropenem in 84.6%, resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin and cloxacillin in 92.3% of cases.

Conclusions: The study shows utilisation pattern of AMAs in LRTI, prescribing on which future intervention studies may be based to promote rational drug use.


Keywords


Antimicrobial, Infection, Sensitivity

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References


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