DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20172720

Drug schedules: knowledge among undergraduate medical students in a government medical college in Eastern India

Tania Sur, Parama Sengupta, Ananya Mandal, Nina Das

Abstract


Background: In India many of the prescription only drugs (Schedule H) are available without prescription, leading to injudicious use, incidences of dangerous drug interactions, and unnecessary economic burden. Thus awareness among healthcare professionals and among common public are equally important. Objective was to assess the knowledge among undergraduate medical students in a government medical college in Eastern India regarding drug schedules in India.

Methods: Willing 3rd semester and 5th semester students participated in the study. We used a pre-tested validated two-part questionnaire to assess the knowledge of undergraduate medical students regarding different drug schedules.

Results: 5th semester students gave significantly higher correct answers (P<0.0001) regarding awareness about Drugs and Cosmetics Act 1940, different drug schedules in India, expiry period, guidelines for maintaining the details of standards for patent and proprietary medicines, guidelines regarding import and manufacture of new drugs, guidelines regarding import and manufacture of new drugs, any special license is required for the manufacture and sale of psychotropic drugs, drugs marketed only under “generic name”, guideline regarding pack size of drugs, and guidelines regarding good manufacturing practice (GMP)?. Analysis of second set of questionnaires revealed that the 5th semester students identified the different drug categories more correctly compared to the 3rd semester students.

Conclusions: Doctors are one of the principle and reliable sources of drug information for the general population. Thus, it becomes relevant that the undergraduate medical students should regularly brush up their knowledge regarding drug regulations even after passing Pharmacology examination in the later years of training.


Keywords


Drug schedules, Drugs and cosmetics act 1940, Schedule H drugs, Undergraduate medical students

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