Evaluation of prescribing patterns in diabetic and hypertensive patients in a South Delhi Hospital

Vikas Pandey, Ubedul Hoda, M. Aqil, M. Sharma, M. Akhtar, R. Khandelwal, Abul Kalam Najmi

Abstract


Background: Drug utilization studies (DUS) defined by World Health Organization as the marketing, distribution, prescription and use of drugs in a society, considering its consequences, either medical, social, and economic. The increasing importance of DUS as a valuable investigation resource in pharmacoepidemiology has been linking it with other health related areas, such as public health, pharmacovigilance, pharmacoeconomics, and pharmacogenetics.

Methods: The study was a prospective DUS carried out in medicine OPD of Indian Institute of Technology Hospital, New Delhi, India in which a total of 595 prescriptions of hypertensive and diabetic patients were reviewed. All diabetic and/or hypertensive patients; irrespective of age, gender; who had least one drug in the prescription were included. Data were collected by screening of physician’s prescribing record and patient medication profile.

Results: A total of 595 prescriptions were recorded. 57.31% were males as compared to 42.69% females. 54.62% patients were hypertensive (325 prescription); 14.78% patients were diabetic (88 prescription) whilst 30.58% had both the diseases. Of 507 prescriptions having antihypertensive drugs, combination therapy was utilized (40.8%) in the prescriptions and out of 270 prescriptions having antidiabetic drugs, 143 (52.96%) prescription were of combination therapy. Among antihypertensive drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were the most frequently prescribed class of drugs (19.18%). The combination most commonly prescribed was amlodipine and atenolol (14.05%). Antidiabetic drugs made up for 11.05% of the total drugs prescribed. 28.78% of all hypoglycemic agents were sulfonylurea. Glimepiride and metformincombination was the most prescribed anti-diabetic drugs combination (16.16%).

Conclusion: Both hypertension and diabetes are considered to be lifestyle diseases. Hence, apart from optimal and appropriate prescribing, there is a need for lifestyle modification to obtain improved outcomes. Combination therapy was observed in a high percentage of prescriptions. Though monotherapy is associated with improved compliance and fewer side effects, combination therapy is desirable for synergistic actions and to overcome complications.


Keywords


Drug utilization study, Anti-hypertensive, Anti-diabetic

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