Effects of carbonated beverage and fruit juice on salivary pH among children in orphanage of Bareilly city: an in vivo study

Authors

  • Anagha Agrawal Department of Public Health Dentistry, Narsinhbhai Patel Dental College, Visnagar, Gujarat, India
  • Shobhit Saxena Department of Orthodontics, Narsinhbhai Patel Dental College, Visnagar, Gujarat, India
  • Bhairavi Baviskar Department of Orthodontics, ACPM Dental College, Dhule, Maharashtra, India
  • Eshita S. Govilkar Department of Orthodontics, ACPM Dental College, Dhule, Maharashtra, India
  • Shweta D. Mishra Department of Orthodontics, ACPM Dental College, Dhule, Maharashtra, India
  • Mayuri Nepale Department of Public Health Dentistry, ACPM Dental College, Dhule, Maharashtra, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20230390

Keywords:

Carbonated beverage, Fruit juice, Orphaned children

Abstract

Background: High degree of urbanization and economic development have resulted in rapid changes in diet and lifestyles, because of which there is a tremendous increase in prevalence of dental caries in developing countries. The aim of the study is to assess the acidogenic potential of commonly consumed carbonated beverage and commercially available fruit juice at various time intervals among orphan children.

Methods: This is an in vivo study in which 60 orphan children were included. Two beverage groups (carbonated beverage and fruit juice) were tested for salivary pH before having respective drinks (baseline) and after having drinks at specific time intervals (immediately after, after 15 min and 30 min). Intra-group and inter-group comparisons were done using Friedman test and Mann Whitney U test.

Results: Both the groups showed decrease in salivary pH after consumption and recovery of salivary pH to baseline value after 30 min.

Conclusions: Beverages produce a remarkable drop in the salivary pH as they contain organic acids and sugars but saliva by virtue of its buffering capacity nullifies this effect and after some time it comes to normal.

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Published

2023-02-22

How to Cite

Agrawal, A., Saxena, S., Baviskar, B., Govilkar, E. S., Mishra, S. D., & Nepale, M. (2023). Effects of carbonated beverage and fruit juice on salivary pH among children in orphanage of Bareilly city: an in vivo study. International Journal of Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 12(2), 216–221. https://doi.org/10.18203/2319-2003.ijbcp20230390

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Original Research Articles